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A Scientific Explanation of How Cannabis Causes the Munchies

THC appears to increase our sensitivity to scents and flavours by using naturally occurring neural networks to convince the brain that it’s starving.It’s one of the most well-known effects of cannabis: the powerful surge in appetite many users feel after smoking or ingesting the flower, colloquially known as “the munchies.”For medicinal users that have trouble eating due to chemotherapy, this can be one of the flower’s biggest benefits. For recreational users, this benefit can also be rather enjoyable, if unkind on the waistline. But for years, scientists have struggled to understand how cannabis’ active ingredient—tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—stimulates appetite. A team of European neuroscientists led by Giovanni Marsicano of the University of Bordeaux has found that, in mice, THC fits into receptors in the brain’s olfactory bulb, significantly increasing the animals’ ability to smell food and leading them to eat more of it. A big part of the reason why you might eat more food after using cannabis, the research indicates, is simply that you can smell and taste it more acutely. This effect of THC has to do with the underlying reason why the chemical affects the human brain so potently in the first place. Likely produced by the cannabis plant as a self-defense against herbivores who might feel disorientated after eating the plant and avoid it in the future, THC fits into receptors that are part of the brain’s natural endocannabinoid system, which helps to control emotions, memory, pain sensitivity and appetite. Our brains typically produce their own chemicals (called cannabinoids) that fit into these same receptors, so by mimicking their activity, THC can artificially alter the same factors in dramatic ways. The scientists began by exposing mice (increasingly used in neuroscientific research because of the surprising amount of cognitive similarities they share with humans) to banana and almond oils as a test of sensitivity to scent. When they did so, the mice sniffed the oils extensively at first, then stopped showing interest in them, a well-known phenomenon called olfactory habituation. Mice that were dosed with THC, however, kept on sniffing, demonstrating an enhanced sensitivity to the scents. These THC-dosed mice also ate much more chow when given the chance, showing an increased appetite. The researchers also genetically engineered some mice to lack a type of cannabinoid receptor in their olfactory bulbs and subjected them to the same experiment. They found that even if these mice were given THC, it had no effect: They still habituated to the scent, showing that the flower’s scent-enhancing powers involved activity in this region of the brain. In addition, these mice did not demonstrate an increased appetite when given the drug, showing that the “munchies” effect was dependent on olfactory lobe activity as well.The upshot of all this: If mice are an accurate model for humans, one of the ways that THC increases appetite is by making us more sensitive to the smells of food. Because scent and taste are so closely related, it likely allows us to better taste flavours as well.   This finding is likely just a piece of the THC-and-appetite puzzle. Previous research has found that cannabis also acts on receptors in a region of the brain called the nucleus accumbens, increasing the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine—and the sensation of pleasure—that comes as a result of eating while high. Other work has found that THC additionally interacts with the same sorts of receptors in the hypothalamus, leading to release of the hormone ghrelin, which stimulates hunger. The one aspect that ties together these disparate mechanisms is that they all involve the brain’s natural endocannabinoid systems. THC—and, by consequence, Cannabis—does much of its work by manipulating the same pathways that the brain uses to normally regulate the senses. But perhaps most interesting is that the study hints at a compelling metaphor for the way THC manipulates this natural system: it mimics sensations felt when we’re deprived of food. As a final test, the researchers forced some mice to fast for 24 hours, and found that this drove up levels of natural cannabinoids in the olfactory lobe. Not surprisingly, these starved mice showed greater scent sensitivity and ate much more too.Most intriguing, the genetically engineered mice with olfactory lobes that lacked cannabinoid receptors did not show increased scent sensitivity or appetite even when they were starved. This indicates that both THC and the natural cannabinoids that result from starvation are acting on the same neural pathway to allow us to smell and taste with greater sensitivity, and thus eat more. In other words, THC appears to give us the munchies by convincing our brains that we’re …

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How Terpenes inform our understanding of cannabis

There are many strains of cannabis, the characteristics and effects of which vary greatly. Making informed choices allows you to find the strain that is the best selection for your particular taste or preference. So how do we use science to organize the choices and make decisions? The current understanding: Phytomorphology vs ChemometricsIndica, Sativa, and Hybrid represent the current terminology used to sort and predict the effect of strains of cannabis. However, these terms describe the physical characteristics of the plant during growth and do not actually correlate to the effects of a strain at all. Instead of using Indica, Sativa, Hybrid, we should look to the chemistry of the plant to predict the effects. The bioactive compounds in cannabis and hemp present in the highest volume are the cannabinoids and terpenes. Cannabinoids and terpenes in cannabis can represent upwards of 40% of the mass of a female flower. It is the profile of these highly potent compounds that is the best predictor of the effects of a particular strain. This profile is referred to as the plant’s chemotype; the identification and measurement of the cannabinoids and terpenoids in a strain. Then why do people say “Indica, Sativa, Hybrid”?Indica, Sativa, and Hybrid are in fact descriptors of the phytomorphology (the physical attributes) of the plant. In the past, these terms may have been more accurate at describing the attributes of strains, but they are now outdated. Due to continued breeding and hybridization of cannabis and hemp varieties, the original, physical characteristics of Cannabis Indica and Cannabis Sativa are no longer relevant in determining the chemical composition—and inevitably the effect—of the plant. So basically, we are using terms that no longer mean what we think they do. Indica Phytomorphology: Short, squatty, wide/large leaf, short(er) floweringEffects (no-longer accurate): Physically sedating; relaxing; couchlocksativa plant phytomorphology Sativa Phytomorphology: Long, stretchy, thin leaf, long floweringEffects (no-longer accurate): Energizing, uplifting, cerebralSo talk to the Expert Budtenders at Ideal Buds who are happy to offer their assistance in finding the Ideal Buds for you …

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Let’s Talk Terpenes

Some of the most common terpenes in cannabis include Myrcene, Limonene, Caryophyllene, Pinene and Linalool: Let’s start with one of the terpene’s which is found in the more common brands of cannabis, Myrcene. This essential oil is found in things like bay leaves, hops and mango. It can be used to unwind and relax. Most importantly, this terp aids cannabinoids with their biological functions, helping molecules such as THC and CBD to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Regulated products available at Ideal Buds which feature this terpene include Tropic Thunder Hybrid 2:1 Vape Cartridge by General Admission, Tsunami by Hexo and OS.HASH 10 by Original Stash Then there’s Limonene and as its name suggests, this terp is found in citrus fruits (its peels) and even many household cleaners. Consumers are said to use this for an energizing or uplifting experience. But don’t be confused, there are two versions of this hydrocarbon. R-limonene (also called D-limonene) smells like citrus, whereas S-limonene smells more like pine. Some of the products available at Ideal Buds with this particular terpene are BC Organic Secret Strawberry Live Rosin by Simply Bare Organic, Stargazer 510 Thread Cartridge by Broken Coast, and Freshly Baked #76 by OGEN Ltd.   Next up, is Caryophyllene. This essential oil is found in several herbs and spices, including every day black pepper. Most consumers agree this terp can provide an overall calming experience. Similar to Myrcene, this helpful hydrocarbon also aids in the biological function of cannabis, activating parts of the endocannabinoid system that other terpenes cannot reach. The regulated product’s that have this terpene are the OS.HASH 10 by Original Stash, BC Organic Blue Dream by Simply Bare and Blendcraft Sativa Shatter by Qwest. Another well-known terpene is Pinene. It’s found in pine needles, conifers and herbs like rosemary. Consumers report feelings of increased alertness and focus from this particular essential oil. This terpene is said to have the ability to counteract some of the potentially unwanted effects of THC. Available at Ideal Buds, this dried flower from Nor’Easter Plus by Skosha is one cultivar that includes this terpene. There’s also Amnesia Haze prerolls by Station House, Trainwreck Redee 510 Thread Cartridge by Redecan and Wappa Shatter by Fireside. The terpene Linalool is another common compound. It can be found in over 200 different plants such as lavender, cinnamon and is added to many botanical repellents. It’s known to produce a more calming or chill experience, similar to how a standard essential oil would. One regulated product available at Ideal Buds featuring this terpene is this Subway Scientist by Riff. Other cultivars includeTHCA Diamonds by Kolab and Goji OG Vape Cartridge by Foray. Ideal Buds is your only Locally owned and family operated cannabis shop in Dryden, where we try all our products before we stock them to ensure we carry only the best at Ideal Buds. You can count on …

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A Great High is a Planned High!

So you’ve partaken, and you didn’t quite have a plan. Maybe you’re about to smoke and want to make the most of it. This article is the first of many to be used as a guide for what to do when you’re enjoying cannabis and are at a loss for an appropriate activity. What should you do while you’re high?How High are You?Depending on how much you’ve partaken we have some different suggestions for what would be the best activity, along with some recommended strains you’ll be able to find at Ideal Buds in Dryden 😁✌️. If you’ve heavily decided to go with some edibles or a massive hit from a dab rig, then there is a more limited list of options. Fun Things To Do When You’re High Pt11. NappingTaking a nap is a godsend when you are experiencing a myrcene heavy strain. You can drift off on your couch to a faraway land or fall into a blissful abyss of snoozing. The right kind of cannabis can help you drift off and catch up on some much-needed rest. If toking and sleep is not a right combination for you, then you may be more to CBD productsRecommended Strain: LA Kush Cakes by Natural History What To Do When You’re High Is Up To YouThere are a plethora of things to do while you’re high, but you also need the right tools to get there. We have everything you need right here in our shop. Cannabis can enhance nearly any experience, so there is no reason ever to be bored. Try out something new and hopefully you will have exciting and positive …

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FUN THINGS TO DO WHEN YOU’RE HIGH PT 2. Meditation

A cannabis high can help you pour over your thoughts in profound contemplative silence. Your sense of time is often changed while under the effects of cannabis and for some this stretching of time makes it easier to think about what’s on your mind, or perhaps about nothing at all.Terpenes like myrcene, linalool, and beta-caryophyllene can be extremely useful in practicing meditation in relaxing the body, calming the nerves, and allowing for easier focus on breathing patterns.Ideal Bud dry flower strains and concentrates available now with complementary meditation terpene profiles are:PreNup by Sugarbud, Raider Kush by Riff and Sativa Wax by Blendcraft Some canna-lovers who do not smoke their cannabis can still enjoy the benefits of enhanced meditation with edibles, topical creams or other cannabis products such as: Muscle THC Body Cream by Proofly or Muscle Balance 1:1 Cream by Proofly Cannabis-infused teas and edibles can produce effects that can enhance meditation experiences as well such as:Everie Vanilla Rooibos CBD Tea, 3 PackBy Everie or Everie Lavender Chamomile CBD Tea, 3 Pack By Everie Edibles: Blaspberry Soft Chews by San Rafael ’71 and Wana Quick Pineapple Coconut indica by Wana just to name a couple. All products available at your Ideal Buds Cannabis Shop …

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The Best Things To Do When You’re High Pt 4.READING

Recommended Strains & Concentrates high in Pinene, Limonene and Caryophyllene available right now at Ideal Buds are : Indica Blend Wax by Blendcraft, Gas Berries #112 by OGEN and White Widow By 7ACRES I just love reading! It’s something I do allot of! Every day! And I prefer to do it High! This particular book is one I highly recommend and you can get it right now for your Kindle off amazon.ca (what a wonderful world!) I feel that with the right terpene profile and the correct cannabinoid ratios, the experience is most pleasurable. This can be tricky but rewarding. I find that while high I prefer nonfiction to fiction. Although a short read like a pulp adventure novel can come alive with a joint in hand, thicker selections may seem to drag on and erode your attention span. Some people get lost in a thick book though, and a bowl full of good pipe-weed can help you dive even deeper.Pinene is said to promote temporary feelings of alertness and memory aid.   Limonene is said to be able to temporarily increase energy and elevate mood by increasing serotonin and influencing receptors that trigger the release of dopamine. It is believed that Beta-Caryophyllene may help your brain function more efficiently by boosting oxygen and reducing …

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Why Indica, Sativa And Hybrid Classifications Mean Close To Nothing

Our goal at IDEAL BUDS is to empower our customers to develop their nose instead of relying solely on strain names or outdated indica/sativa dichotomies. Your nose can help you detect the terps that you’re most suited for, or that you need most! It’s almost guaranteed that you will speak or hear the terms “indica,” “sativa,” or “hybrid,” at least once while visiting any cannabis shop. These three terms remain, by far, the most common for describing the attributes and effects of cannabis flower — and even products like edibles and vapes lay claim to the categories. For most of us, these labels are shorthand. Indicas are chill, sativas are energetic, and hybrids represent a balance between the two. But are these classifications accurate, and — perhaps more importantly — can they be used to authentically predict a person’s experience when consuming cannabis? Indeed, according to most people in the know, they aren’t necessarily accurate. Here’s the lowdown on why indica, sativa, and hybrid classifications are slowly beginning to fall by the wayside, and what’s replacing them. Roots of Indica and Sativa In the late 1700s, the French biologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck classified two varieties of the plant we now know as weed, ganja, marijuana, or cannabis. They were, you guessed it, Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica. His descriptions of Cannabis sativa reflect a lighter coloured, pointy shaped leaf and a taller plant, while the species identified as Cannabis indica describe a shorter plant of Eastern origins with broader, dark coloured leaves. Rigorous lab testing didn’t exist in those days, but it’s clear that plants from that time period had much lower levels of THC than what we see on today’s market. And as for their terpene content? That’s anyone’s guess. Today, most cannabis industry folk agree that the categories of indica and sativa are not particularly helpful. Decades of crossbreeding have left us with few, if any, pure indicas or sativas. The 18th century plant classifications were totally based on morphology — or what the plant looked like — and not on genetics or the effect the plant has on the person using it. In other words, if a plant is labelled an indica, a sativa, or a hybrid based on its height, or the shape of its leaves — or even its presumed genetics — that has little to no correlation with its effect on the consumer. If Indica and Sativa Aren’t Reliable Categories, What Should We Look For Instead? Cannabinoid Content The answer here depends, of course, on what you’re trying to accomplish. Consumer’s may have different goals and criteria, and each person will likely encounter variations over the course of a day, a week, and a lifetime in terms of the cannabis compounds (a.k.a. cannabinoids) that will serve them best. No matter your goals, a strain’s total THC and CBD content, and the ratios between them, matter. THC is, of course, associated with the psychoactive qualities of the plant and has numerous uses. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid, CBD, is used for it’s said relief from seizures, anxiety, and inflammation, among other things. Adult use consumers may appreciate both THC and CBD in varying ratios, depending on how altered they would like to feel. Consumers should always first consider the THC concentration of flower, and then decide how much of it they want to consume. THC concentration has skyrocketed in the last decade, but more is not necessarily better; it’s worth noting here that both THC and CBD have biphasic effects, which means that a dose in excess of what’s needed can worsen the desired effects that the correct dose would help provide. A few other cannabinoids like THCV, CBG, and CBN are also starting to get attention for their potential uses and benefits, though fewer commercial strains have yet to advertise significant percentages of these compounds. Terpene Composition Beyond cannabinoid content, terpenes are where it’s at and that and the entourage effect are what we focus on at Ideal Buds!. Terpenes are the aromatic compounds that serve the plant by attracting pollinators and deterring predators. When you inhale the scent of fresh or well-preserved cannabis flower, you’re smelling the floral, fruity, herbal, spicy, or even “skunky” evidence of terpene content. The six most common terpenes found in cannabis — myrcene, limonene, pinene, terpinolene, linalool, and caryophyllene — each have distinct characteristics that sway or influence the direction of a consumer’s experience and interact in synergistic ways with the cannabinoids through what’s called the entourage effect. People seeking a said sleepy effect reach for flower containing myrcene or linalool; for pain relief, it is commonly believed that limonene and beta-caryophyllene are most effective. Pinene is a terpene commonly used for bronchodilation and anti-inflammatory effects,, and strains high in limonene for their said uplifting effects which I personally have felt consistently myself. These recommendations are, to date, based on clinical experience with humans, but not on research. Varying terpene compositions will influence a high in the direction of a more relaxed or energetic tone — which, in fact, mimics the classic expectations consumers have of indicas and sativas. But it’s the terpenes, much more than the ancestry of a plant or its morphology (shape and appearance), that determine these factors. Terpene analysis leads to a more accurate ability to understand cannabis and to gauge effects.. Considering the countless combinations of cannabinoid and terpene compositions that show up in flower, it may seem daunting to find the right cultivar for you, but 98 percent of samples analyzed can be broken down into 12 categories, or archetypes, with relatively uniform effects. A caveat, however, is the fact that the compounds in cannabis interact in complex ways with a person’s endocannabinoid system. There are a lot of variables at play to determine how something makes you feel, versus how it makes me feel.. Tolerance, metabolism, and lifestyle, among other factors, come into play. Cannabis is a plant, not a pharmaceutical product, and as such may never deliver the predictability that synthetic compounds can. Why Does the Indica/Sativa Dichotomy Persist? With all we now know about the subtle and complex nature of the plant, it’s perplexing that “indica” and “sativa” are still in everyday use. Part of the reason lies in the fact that sophisticated lab testing for cannabis is new. In the millennia of human history with the plant, there were few rigorous and reliable ways to understand the clear differences between one variety and another — so classifying plants as indica and sativa was as good as we had at the time.” Today, the continued references to indica and sativa are little more than marketing language. If someone smoked or vaped the flower and felt sleepy or relaxed, they would call a variety indica, and if they felt energized, they’d label it sativa. The bottom line though is that it’s pretty much BS when it comes to the species. In response, some new cannabis companies have begun to name their flower and other products after the supposed effect, rather than rely on what would be esoteric names for novice consumers like “OG Kush” or ” Sour Diesel.” The flower brand like Dosist for instance, carries products with words like “bliss” or “calm,” based on the their cannabinoid and terpene profiles, rather than on simplistic indica/sativa classification — but even so, the extent to which a strain called “calm” makes one feel that way is still subjectively dependent on a person’s unique endocannabinoid system and other factors. So, Are Strain Names Reliable? Maybe. Because of the long history of prohibition-era crossbreeding without access to lab-based analysis, it’s still possible to find two wildly divergent batches of flower bearing the same name. But, strains are not as misrepresented in the name game as some people think. Even though renaming does take place for the most “played out” names like Blue Dream and Gelato, the OCS has found more consistency across different growers and suppliers than anticipated. Nonetheless, the goal of IDEAL BUDS staff is to empower our customers to develop their nose instead of relying solely on strain names or outdated indica/sativa dichotomies. Your nose can help you detect the terps that you’re most suited for, or that you need most! Should Terpene Testing and Labeling Be Required? Canadian consumers have been asking for this kind of information and the industry is responding with many producers now choosing to provide their terpene profiles and percentages on their packaging. An Evolving Relationship with the Plant We’re entering a phase in our relationship with cannabis that is driven by data instead of anecdote or hearsay. Consumers can now be more intentional with their consumption based on how they want their endocannabinoid systems to be engaged. Testing is helping to provide a language of meaning to interpret this plant and its message to us. …

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Choosing The Right Strain For You

What makes cannabis strains unique?There are a variety of elements that make up a strain’s unique profile:• Cannabinoid content. The cannabis plant contains a host of cannabinoids, chemical compounds that interact with the body’s endocannabinoid system to produce a variety of effects. A strain’s cannabinoid profile or, the concentration of cannabinoids like THC and CBD, is a key differentiating characteristic. For example, strains with high THC and little or no CBD are more intoxicating while strains with a 2:1 CBD to THC ratio can be more relaxing and produce less of an intense or intoxicating high.• Terpene content. Terpenes are molecules in the cannabis plant that not only produce flavour and aroma, but also help support cannabinoids and other cannabis molecules in producing effects in both the body and the mind. The cannabis plant produces over 200 terpenes, and individual strains will have varying terpene profiles and concentrations. As such, strains can have different flavours,, aromas, and effects.• Environmental variables. Environmental variables during cultivation, like the nutrients in the soil, can affect both the terpene and cannabinoid profile so the same cannabis grown in different environments could wind up as different strains.The deal with Indicas, Sativas, and HybridsAnother set of terms you’ve probably heard in connection with cannabis strains is indica, sativa, and hybrid. But chances are, what you’ve heard about them probably isn’t accurate.Most people think that indica, sativa, and hybrid are used to describe a particular strain’s effects, that sativas produce an uplifting, cerebral high; indicas leave users more relaxed, mellow, and sleepy; and hybrids produce some combination of the two.A strain’s classification as indica, sativa, or hybrid isn’t actually about any particular effects. It’s about the physical characteristics and structure of the plant.The truth is, a strain’s classification as indica, sativa, or hybrid isn’t actually about any particular effects. It’s about the physical characteristics and structure of the plant, which can be extremely helpful information for growers, but not so much for consumers.In terms of growing cannabis, the indica/sativa/hybrid classification is good to know. But when it comes to choosing the right strain of cannabis, it’s much less important. How to decide which cannabis strain to tryThere are a few criteria you’ll want to consider when choosing a strain:• Flavour and aroma. A strain’s terpene profile can produce subtle or intense flavours and aromas. Depending on your personal preferences, you can choose a strain that provides that flavour and aroma at the intensity that seems appealing to you.• Desired effects. Everyone reacts to cannabis differently, and there’s no guarantee that a strain will produce any particular effect. You can, however, try strains with a cannabinoid and terpene profile that are likely to produce your desired effect. For example, if you want to experience intoxicating effects, it would make sense to go with something with a higher THC content. If you were looking for a more relaxing experience, you might try a strain containing linalool, a terpene reported to have stress-relieving properties.• Potency. Depending on the concentration of cannabinoids, particularly THC, some strains are more potent than others and the level of potency you’re looking for can help you decide which strains to try. Looking for an intense high? Try something more potent. Looking for a less intense experience? Go with something less potent.• Growing method. Some people have a preference for cannabis that is grown in or outdoors. If you’re one of those people, you’ll obviously want to try strains that align with your personal preference.• Potential medical benefits. Depending on a strain’s cannabinoid ratio or terpene profile, it could have a variety of possible medicinal properties. If you’re thinking about using cannabis to treat a medical condition, talk to a medical professional to find out which strains might be helpful.• Budget. There are strains at every price point, from wallet-friendly to high-end. If you have a particular budget in mind, that can definitely play into which cannabis strains you decide to try.   The importance of lab testingThere are a lot of different characteristics that make up individual strains. In order to effectively decide whether you want to try a strain, you need to know what those characteristics are and that’s where lab testing comes in.Any cannabis you buy in a legal cannabis shop is required to go through rigorous lab testing to determine both the cannabinoid and terpene profile of each particular strain. It also tests to make sure the plant doesn’t contain harmful levels of pesticides, fungicides, or other chemicals, which can lead to health issues. Not only does lab testing let you know what’s in your strain, but it also lets you know that the cannabis you’re consuming is safe. Not only does lab testing let you know what’s in your strain, which can help you decide which strains to try, but it also lets you know that the cannabis you’re consuming is safe, no matter what strain you decide to go with. Choose strains that are right for youWhen it comes to choosing cannabis strains, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach. The strains that other people love might fall flat for you (and vice versa). All Ideal Budtenders and employees maintain their Budtender Expert Certification and have vast knowledge pertaining to our menu so be sure to ask for their assistance. All products found on the Ideal Buds menus has been hand picked and experienced through joint smoking, vaporizing and Bong hits before being placed on our menu so we have given you a bouquet of delicious bud products to choose from! So now that you know the defining characteristics of each strain and how to evaluate them, you have the information you need to explore the Ideal Buds menu and choose the strains that are right for …

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We Try It Before You Buy It!

We spend our own money trying dozens of strains every month and typically only find about 3 out of 12 that are Ideal enough to carry in our store! We Try It Before You Buy It so that you will not be disappointed with your Ideal purchases! Statements like”I can throw a dart at your menu and always get something great “ are what we like to hear and what we pride ourselves on. We know great bud!! So if it’s on our menu, you know we’ve tried it and it’s passed our stringent Strain selection process for our Ideal Buds customer’s benefit! True Bud Lovers Serving True Bud Lovers! It’s a beautiful thing! …

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THC is a poor indicator of potency!

THC is a poor indicator of potency! Before cannabis was legal, no one ever asked their dealer what the THC potency was!! Lol! It wasn’t tested anyway, and black market still isn’t tested so anything they may have said or still say it BS. Besides, it’s been found that high levels of THC actually seem to aggravate us! We don’t like it! What we want to focus on is the entourage effect, and that’s what Ideal Buds is all about! The best way to determine whether cannabis is going to be good is to do what we’ve always done! GIVE IT A WHIFF! Once you’ve found right combination of cannabinoids, flavonoids and terpenes, you will have found your Ideal Bud. Ask our Expert Certified Budtenders to assist you in finding the cannabis experience you are seeking. Cannabis is a beautiful thing and we want to help you enjoy it as much as we can. …

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Picking a Cannabis Consumption Method

If your body is a temple—and of course it is—it is a temple with a VIP entrance. Will eating an edible or taking a puff of a vape change how your body absorbs cannabinoids? (Advanced cannabis consumers can think of it this way: Does the method of ingestion change how my endocannabinoid system is triggered?) The short answer is “of course” — your digestive tract is different from your pulmonary system. Experiencing the onset of effects in seconds rather than in half an hour is significant. And depending on your consumption method, some cannabinoids may be lost during the process. So how do you pick a consumption method? A better way to think about this might be, What is the point? That is, what effects are you seeking to experience and what context are you in? With this starting inquiry, the right method will reveal itself to you. Grasping this concept will also give you a working understanding of what science nerds call “ cannabinoid pharmacokinetics,” which is a fancy way of describing how the body absorbs, distributes, metabolizes and clears cannabinoids from its system after consumption. There’s a lot to take in here, admittedly. But it’s all quite fascinating and super handy, to be honest. So let’s break it down together! A BRIEF REVIEW OF KEY TERMINOLOGY Scientists have actually identified over 100 cannabinoids, but THC and CBD are the ones you’ll commonly see printed on product labels. You may also be aware that both of these cannabinoids activate different receptors in your endocannabinoid system, a network of neurotransmitters located throughout your brain and body (but not uniformly) that regulate key functions like mood, appetite and sleep. Which receptors they reach first and in what quantities absolutely hinges on consumption method! The blood brain barrier is a semi-permeable barrier that blocks certain compounds in the blood from entering the brain (but not other parts of the body!). And bioavailability is a measure of how much of a substance (like THC) can be absorbed into your bloodstream. Some consumption methods let more cannabinoids into your system than others. Now let’s take a look at how different cannabis consumption methods can impact your experience. CONCERN: I WANT TO GET HIGH, NOW—BUT NOT TOO HIGH, AND NOT FOR TOO LONG!Inhalation still delivers the most immediate effects–both rapid and efficient—and is thus the best method for immediate relief that the user can fine-tune with additional puffs, a technique called titration. Research indicates smoking THC provides a higher level of bioavailability than oral ingestion. However, there are a number of different factors that play into THC bioavailability of various consumption methods for different people. And some people report feeling more intoxicated after eating an edible than from consuming the same dose via inhalation. The key thing to know is that the effects of inhalation generally hit harder and faster than oral ingestion, but the effects of cannabinoid-infused edibles last far longer—which can be a plus or a minus, depending on your level of experience and intended use. The delayed onset makes titration more difficult, and thus, it’s easier to accidentally ingest too much and have an extended unpleasant experience. Discomfort from smoking recedes quickly. Not so with edibles. Inhalation delivery methods include smoking and vaporizing. Some consumers prefer lighting up a joint, while others prefer the cooling effects of using a water pipe or bong filled with ice cubes. For many consumers who’d rather avoid inhaling smoke altogether, vaporizers are a great option. Devices range from tiny vape pens to handheld portable vaporizers and table-top vapes all of which you can find at Ideal Buds in Dryden. CONCERN: I WANT LONG-LASTING RELIEF (AND I DON’T MIND GETTING HIGH)!If, on the other hand, you’re seeking long-lasting relief for conditions like insomnia or chronic pain, the extended effects of orally ingesting cannabinoid-infused edibles may be a big selling point. The long-lasting effects of oral ingestion also have the added benefit of reducing the frequency of doses needed for relief. Eating cannabis means the cannabinoids are absorbed through your metabolic system, rather than going directly into your bloodstream (and your brain, and the rest of your body) through the lungs. This process where cannabinoids are metabolized by enzymes in your liver before moving into the bloodstream is described as the “first-pass metabolism” of ingested edibles. And it explains why edibles have a delayed onset and why the effects of oral ingestion last longer than inhalation. CONCERN: I WANT LOCALIZED PAIN RELIEF, BUT I DON’T WANT TO GET HIGH!Not everyone likes feeling the intoxicating effects of THC. But many people who don’t want a psychoactive, full-body high still want to experience the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids. For such consumers, topical cannabis products are an excellent option for localized pain relief or relief from various inflammatory skin conditions. Topical cannabis products applied to the skin react with local endocannabinoid receptors in the skin, muscle and ligature, but do not reach the bloodstream and thus, don’t trigger the full endocannabinoid system or produce intoxicating effects in the brain. Many consumers attest to the effective localized relief they get from applying topical sprays and lotions with equal parts THC and CBD to aches and pains like an arthritic wrist or a sore knee. And because these topicals don’t produce intoxicating effects, they can be applied throughout the day without much concern about being in an “appropriate” environment. All of the topicals found in our Ideal Menu are used personally by us, the owners and have proven themselves as highly effective and something we use daily. This is not intended to be a comprehensive guide. There are more factors at play that affect how your body reacts to cannabis, including frequency of use as well as biometrics like nutrition and sleep. But the main takeaway is an understanding that ingestion method absolutely matters, and and your preferred delivery method will likely come down to your desired outcome and reasons for consuming in the first place. …

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Thank You Dryden, Sioux Lookout And Surrounding Area

We have been open for just over 6 months now and we’ve been overwhelmed by your support! When we first opened, there were many unknowns and a great deal of capital at risk. We wanted to create a business with good paying jobs for Dryden and not just more minimum wage jobs (we pay 13-23% higher the Ontario average Budtender wage). We want our employees to have “careers “ in the cannabis industry so accordingly our business model had to account for that. As cannabis consumers ourselves, we know that prices were always an issue. As an accountant for that last 27 years, I also know that a business needs to be sustainable; it is a balancing act to say the least! Many of you have already noticed our prices dropping over the last months, but today, we are happy to announce that we’ve revamped our business model and have dropped prices on all cannabis products!! This is all possible because of you, so we wanted to get the prices down for your long weekend! Unlike other industries that raise prices before the long weekend😁 No need to rush in as this is not a sale; these are our new everyday prices. Thanks again everyone! With your continued support, we will be making more price drops every chance we get! Gary Daignault President, Ideal Buds …

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Fun Things To Do When You’re High

WEIGHT TRAINING Cannabis: A portal to “the zone” Strains containing the terpenes Pinene, Terpineol and Caryophyllene are said to be most helpful for a focused workout and efficient recovery. I’ve certainly experienced this personally myself and always toke before and after every workout. Everyone is different though so if you want to give it a go, always remember to start low and go slow! My personal favourites for workouts available now at Ideal Buds are: Jack Haze by 7ACRES, Delahaze by San Rafael ’71, Clementine Punch by Ritual Green, or a Ghost Train Haze Pre-roll by Color Cannabis Many athletes who puff and work out/compete do so because they claim cannabis gets them into “the zone” and provides them with a deep connection between their minds and their bodies. This makes sense when you consider that cannabis alters our perceptions in a way that may be beneficial for people engaging in some types of physical activity. Cannabis has been shown, in scientific studies, to substantially affect the way our brains can focus on and pay attention to elements of our environment. If you use THC, you may have noticed that your thoughts can drift frequently while under its influence. Sometimes it’s very difficult to focus on one thing for an extended period of time. While this behaviour may seem like a drawback under many conditions (it’s why you shouldn’t smoke and drive, for example), the phenomenon of “wandering attention” can actually be of great benefit during certain types of exercise. When lifting weights, for example, it’s common to have your attention get “stuck” on one particular portion of each rep’s movement. Since staying close to the correct form for each exercise is crucially important, throughout the entire cycle of movement, many pot-friendly athletes say cannabis lets their attention flit from one part of the movement to another, ensuring a clean and continuous lift that’s as close to the correct form as possible. “The team doctors cheered… but I couldn’t disclose to them all that I was experiencing — no pain, no inflammation, restful sleep, vigorous appetite, a clear head,” said NFL tight end Nate Jackson, describing why he had to keep his cannabis self-therapy a secret. THC actually encourages the type of rapid readjustment of attention that can be a distraction in normal life but is quite beneficial in the highly-artificial milieu of repetitive exercise movements. Jim McAlpine, founder of the pro-pot 420 Games, says of combining cannabis with exercise: “It puts me in a place of higher focus, the Eye of the Tiger-type thing. It’s not for everyone, but for some people who are more athletic and coordinated, it works.” Therefore, learning a complicated new workout routine after consuming cannabis may not be the smartest idea. But, if you’re in good shape and know your way around the gym, a toke or two might be just the ticket for your 100th shoulder-press of the day. Pushing through plateaus The other factor cannabis users/athletes often expound upon is the ability to let them push through plateaus in their workouts and to be able to shunt pain and discomfort aside to triumphantly ascend to new personal bests. Ex-NFL offensive lineman Eben Britton, a staunch advocate of cannabis in sports, told Men’s Health that cannabis “connects” me mentally and emotionally into my body, which allows me to get a more fulfilling workout. It’s very uplifting mentally. It allows me to push through that last couple of reps. I might be fatiguing, but it gets me into a flow state and allows me to push through.” Part of that flow state may come down to cannabis’ ability to dull pain and assist with endurance. There is much academic literature about the efficacy of cannabis’ analgesic properties. This is especially important, since weight-lifting is mostly about repeating the same movements over and over. Active recovery After working out comes the recovery period. There is much active debate over the “correct” amount of recuperation needed, but one thing is for sure: after being exposed to the intense stresses of a high-intensity workout, your body needs time to recover. For example: you must wait for protein synthesis to occur after exercise so your body can make new muscle tissue. The recovery phase of exercise is a valuable opportunity to take advantage of other molecules present in cannabis. Following his bruising defeat at the hands of Conor McGregor in 2016, UFC welterweight superstar Nate Diaz vaped CBD oil at a press conference. He told the assembled media that CBD “helps with the healing process and inflammation”. He could have certainly used a bit of that after coming into repeated contact with McGregor’s fists. That unscripted moment helped launch the idea of CBD as a healing panacea into the popular consciousness. After all, once a popular athlete endorses something, its adoption in living rooms across North America is sure to …

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Cannabis and the Olympics

It’s been a long road, but the Olympic torch finally landed in Japan on 23 July. The latest edition of the Games has been so mired in difficulty that many feared it might not go ahead, with COVID-19 causing seemingly insurmountable logistical issues. It’s also seen its fair share of controversies, with the conversation around cannabis chief among them. The 2020 Games in Tokyo is effectively the first in which professional athletes have been allowed to use cannabis-based products while preparing for the competition. CBD use among professional athletes has been allowed by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) since 2018, and it’s becoming increasingly …

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How Cannabis Effects Your 5 Senses

There’s no end to the list of reasons that people choose to use cannabis, but one thing is for sure: Cannabis certainly has the ability to make people feel happier. The happy, comfortable disposition consumers find themselves after consuming cannabis is thanks to how its makeup affects the chemicals in our brains. This alteration in the brain is what gives us that high feeling and since it affects the brain, it’s worth noting how it can alter all of our senses. Food seems to taste better, music sounds better and trees look prettier, but how? A lot of the effects that cannabis has are connected since it’s the alteration of neurotransmitters in the brain that ultimately affect everything else. Certain neurotransmitters are working harder after consuming cannabis so the brain can process and interpret external stimuli at a quicker rate. While cannabis can affect everyone differently, here’s a look at how cannabis may affect your five senses: SIGHT Consuming cannabis affects your blood pressure which affects the rate at which blood is flowing to the organs. This can actually cause the organ to behave differently than usual. The extra blood flood can cause the pupils to dilate drastically, allowing more light to enter the system. This might be why everything seems literally so much brighter. SMELL Besides the obvious fragrance most strains carry with them, did you know that consuming cannabis can actually enhance your sense of smell? Past animal studies have shown that THC affects the olfactory bulb in animals, which is the part of the brain that allows you to smell. One particular study had a bunch of mice try to find cheese in a labyrinth. Half of the mice were given a dose of THC while the other half was not. The mice that were given the THC found the cheese much faster. Some of the mice that were not given THC were completely unable to find the cheese. TASTE One of the longest running stoner stereotypes is that marijuana consumption makes the consumer want to eat everything but the refrigerator, but there’s more to it and it’s not necessarily that cannabis has any effect on how food tastes. Consuming cannabis can promote the production of ghrelin, otherwise known as the ‘hunger hormone’. Ghrelin is what makes us hungry and crave food. It’s released primarily by the stomach with some released by the small intestine, pancreas and brain. When ghrelin is administered to humans, it can increase food intake by as much as 30 percent. The same goes when the hormone is being increased by cannabis and other external stimuli. This along with more dopamine being released will only enhance whatever you choose to eat following consumption. TOUCH Cannabis is praised for its ability to relieve numerous kinds of pain. This has long been attributed to THC’s ability to muffle the neurotransmitters responsible for causing pain. THC can affect the transfer of amandamine, a chemical responsible for regulating pain, hunger, mood and memory. However, more recently, it’s CBD that’s being given just as much credit for pain relief thanks to its ability to reduce inflammation. Unlike THC, CBD will not cause a high, which is why it’s such a hot topic in the medical field and for those seeking healthier, more natural pain relief options. Cannabis does not completely deafen all the pain, but many suffering from both short term and chronic pain still swear by its pain relieving qualities. HEARING Hearing might actually be the outlier of the five senses as there’s currently no major connection between consuming marijuana and enhanced hearing. A 1976 study tried to find a negative correlation between marijuana consumption and hearing through audiological tests. Half of the test subjects were given cannabis and the other half was given a placebo. Each subject participated in a hearing test before smoking. While the researchers were trying to find a negative impact, what they found was that smoking cannabis had little to no impact on any of the test subject’s hearing ability, positive or negative. When people claim that they can hear music and other sounds better after consuming cannabis, this should be attributed to the effects of higher dopamine levels, which can enhance their reaction to audio stimuli. As cannabis becomes more widely accepted and scientists are able to conduct more research, there’s no telling how many other effects we’ll find that cannabis has on our minds and on our bodies. …

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The Lowdown on Full Spectrum Products

The current cannabis industry is a remarkable machine of innovation and creativity backed by science and research, dedicated to creating products that aim to improve lives in every aspect. You see it every day in product variations and an increased understanding of how cannabis compounds interact with each other and the body.Carefully cultivated, processed, and grown, we could argue that cannabis is at its most incredible pinnacle so far. The result is a more consistent product with reliable outcomes creating happier consumers and a new generation of cannabis consumers. Long story short, this isn’t your parent’s marijuana.Full-spectrum products reflect the years of research and understanding we’ve refined about how cannabis works, what compounds create specific effects, and how to extract properly the over 482 known compounds of the cannabis plant. What’s the big deal with full-spectrum products?Full-spectrum products are one of the most difficult to produce due to the multitude of compounds in the cannabis plant. THC, THCa, CBD, CBDa, CBG, CBGN, terpenes, and flavonoids are all desirable components, and it’s a delicate process to keep them while producing full-spectrum vapes, edibles, or tinctures. While there is no industry consensus on what comprises a true full-spectrum product, we can say that the goal is to keep as much of the full chemical profile of the cannabis as possible through production.That delicate process is essential because of its connection to the entourage effect. One of the best definitions of the entourage effect comes from food and beverage technology experts “Entourage effect is the theory that cannabinoids have more favourable action when delivered with a higher proportion of native phytochemicals such as terpenes, flavonoids, and other cannabinoids. This manifests as both amplification of positive effects (efficacy) and modulation of undesirable ones (tolerability).”Simply put, retaining the naturally occurring compounds in the plant makes for a smoother, more reliable, and more enjoyable experience for consumers. What kinds of full-spectrum products exist?You can buy full-spectrum tinctures, vapes, and edibles from Ideal Buds.Always ask questions and use the staff at Ideal Buds as a source of knowledge. They’re there to guide and help you so you’re able to experience the best possible side of …

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There is so much more to Cannabis than just THC!

You can’t take something from nature that is alive, complex and so beautiful and reduce it down to one single component. Come talk to any one of our Ideal Budtenders to learn about the Entourage Effect and terpenes and have fun empowering yourself to find your own Ideal Buds. ✌️❤️ The synergistic effects of cannabinoids and terpenes offer a great deal of additional benefits which is only beginning to be investigated scientifically. Terpenophenolic compounds also contain biological activities that make them important for human health. As Cannabis consumers become more educated on the full potential of cannabis, cannabis preparations and with the complexities in the various compounds found within cannabis, they will become more discerning in choosing their ideal strains which will help increase the quality of the cannabis available to them along with the research relating to the synergistic benefits of cannabinoids and terpenes. – Excerpt quoting Dr. Ethan …

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Does white ash equal quality cannabis?

We’re probably all familiar with the belief that cannabis flower burning to “white ash” indicates it was grown right or is otherwise good bud. Similarly, we likely all know the old-school belief that holding in a hit gets you higher (“if you cough you don’t get off”), which was disproved by research over 30 years ago. So if the long-held belief that holding in hits gets you higher is not true, yet persists, what about white ash? Is there something about bud that burns to white that makes it better than bud that burns to black? Common white ash theories People who felt a growing step called “flushing” was the cause of white ash and a sign of good bud;people who felt it was a measure of moisture in the bud (too moist bud = black ash);and people critical of the entire premise.“A properly grown bud flushed of nutrients with water for the last 10 days of growth will give you a white ash when the bowl is cashed.” “White burning ash (from anything burning) indicates a clean combustion. You can think of campfires you might have watched. If the wood is green, it leaves a chunky charcoal.” The ‘flushing’ controversy swirlsWhile there is some divide over what white ash signifies, there is pretty wide consensus around the importance of a weed grower’s common practice called “flushing.” Hydroponic indoor growers “flush” the plant for the last 10 days before harvest by only feeding it water, instead of a nutrient mix. Some growers compare flushing cannabis with water to fasting for people, “It forces any stored nutrients to be used up by the plant and triggers a push to ripen.”However, well-flushed flowers that are rushed through the drying and curing process will not burn perfectly. But what does the research on flushing say? Flushing science is thin. There isn’t much research that supports this concept, and there is a Master’s Thesis out there which found flushing to be ineffective in removing any significant amount of nutrient from the bud. It specifically points to a lack of “double-blind studies that have been performed to test the efficacy of flushing,” but notes that despite that absence of research, “the overwhelming majority of cannabis growers flush.” Many of us Cannabis consumers, myself included, feel that we can taste a poor flush when smoking flowers. Why wet weed won’t burn white: While the majority of cannabis growers flush and it is a concern for some consumers, others wonder if black ash may be the result of too much water, rather than not enough. Despite being able to taste the difference in flushed vs. not flushed flowers, black ash is a sign of incomplete combustion, and I’m not aware of a plausible explanation that a cause of poor combustion would be a poor flush. Here listed are the potential reasons for incomplete combustion, such as: too much moisture in the flower (as is the case with a poor dry and cure);a poorly rolled joint;or a really resinous flower.Taste, not ash color, is a better indicator of good bud. Of bowls and black ash White ash may not have as much to do with the bud itself, but how it is smoked, specifically, in a joint or a blunt. Joints/blunts also heat the material that is about to be burned, vaporizing both the resin and moisture in that part of the bud, which means that two of the major contributors to an inefficient combustion—and therefore black ash—are removed from the equation, or at least reduced before that part of the joint even combusts. Additionally, the airflow is much more optimized for an efficient combustion in a joint vs. a bong or bowl.” That is why pipes tend to burn black while joints burn white. Bottom lineIt really comes down to if you like the smell, taste, and the high—not the ash, it seems. White ash on its own is an insufficient proxy for quality; there’s too many other factors at play. (I mean, cigarettes burn pure white, and no one’s Instagramming their Camel Lights.) So if it burns white and you like it—great! If it doesn’t—that can be OK, …

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How to Use Cannabis Without Smoking It

There are a wide variety of different ways to use cannabis without smoking. While waiting on our Cannabis licensing, we ran an accessory store for 2 years and found there is a lot of gimmicky crap out there, so at Ideal Buds, we sell what we use. We don’t sell allot of accessories, but what we do carry are well made without breaking the bank and they have been tried by us and approved. Here are some favourite accessories and ways to use weed without smoking: USING A VAPORIZER Vaporizing is my favourite mode of consuming because a little cannabis goes a long long way (ie one typical joints-worth of Cannabis could fill a vape glass twice!) and all the Buds at Ideal Buds are so tastey it’s a shame not to really appreciate all of those terps via vaping. Easy to clean with a little Orange Chronic cleaner and some Crud Buds also available at Ideal Buds. My Vaporizer of choice is the Arizer Solo, however we have several different types of Vaporizer kits so please don’t hesitate to come in and talk to our Budtenders about them. Vaporizers have become more popular in recent years and are considered a healthier alternative to smoking. When you smoke cannabis, it is combusted at high temperatures, releasing potentially harmful chemicals and smoke. Vaporizers heat weed far more gently, allowing beneficial cannabinoids such as THC and CBD to escape but leaving the more dangerous chemicals behind. Using a vaporizer is also thought to improve the flavour of cannabis as it leaves terpenes intact. Terpenes are the compounds which give marijuana its distinctive smell and taste but are also believed to have a range of health benefits. By adjusting your vape to the right temperature (talk to our Expert Budtenders about this) you may even be able to customize your high by choosing which terpenes and cannabinoids you want to inhale.Another significant advantage of vaping is that it works fast.   DABBING We carry The Focus V CARTA Electronic Smart Rig Kit which comes with a cool app and delivers an amazingly smooth toke after toke after toke! Saves you allot of product to in that it has a reclaimer which makes all the difference! Really the only way I prefer to do dabs, but if you aren’t going to keep it clean, don’t bother. Many prefer to use the RYOT Verb or the Yocan Pen which we also carry and I enjoy using often as well due to their simplicity, however there is no reclaimer but there is also no need for thorough cleaning either. Up to you. If you’re not going to clean your equipment and you know it, then there are other options available other than the Carta and our Budtenders all have their own personal favourite ways to dab, so come talk to our Expert Budtenders to find out what would work best for you, Dabbing is similar to vaping in that it produces vapour rather than smoke. However, there are also a couple of key differences. Firstly, dabbing requires a dab rig rather than a vaporizer. A dab rig consists of a ‘nail’ which is usually made of metal or glass. This is heated with a butane lighter to a high temperature, allowing your marijuana to be vaporized when you drop it on. Secondly, dabbing is a method used to smoke cannabis concentrates. There are many different types of concentrates, including: • Resin • Shatter • Wax • Budder These concentrates are incredibly potent, sometimes containing as much as 90% THC! This means that they are great for recreational users with a high tolerance. However, it also means that it is easy to overdo it and anyone who has never dabbed before should approach this method with caution. When dabs are correctly produced, they provide an extremely pure and clean way to consume your weed. This fact, combined with their awesome potency, makes dabs one of the most popular methods of cannabis consumption today. EDIBLES Ideal Buds carries the most delicious of the edibles available on the Canadian market! Not all edibles are delicious, so that’s why you want to shop where We Try It Before You Buy It! Yummy chocolates, gummies and teas that have all been personally approved for your cannabis enjoyment. So if vaping or dabbing is still too much like smoking for your taste, you could always try Cannabis edibles instead. Edibles are a versatile and tasty way to enjoy weed, and it is great fun to experiment with different recipes. If you want to make your own cannabis-infused treats, you will need to decarboxylate your cannabis first. Decarboxylation is the process of heating weed to convert THCA and CBDA into THC and CBD. THCA and CBDA are found in raw weed, and although they may still have some health benefits, they are not as active as their decarboxylated forms and will definitely not get you high. Edibles can take a while to kick in, possibly up to two hours or more. Many cannabis rookies have made the mistake of getting impatient and taking another dose too soon, then very quickly regretting it. Edibles are great fun, but they are strong and deserve to be treated with respect! One of the major advantages of edibles is that although they take longer to work, the effects also last much longer. This makes them an excellent solution for anyone looking to get several hours from a single dose. CANNABIS OILS & TINCTURES Oils and tinctures are another great way to take cannabis by mouth. Oils are potent concentrates which can be taken as they are or added to food and drinks. Some people like to put them into capsule casings to make them more portable and easier to dose. Like edibles, cannabis oil can take a while to start working, so be patient. It is also extremely strong, and inexperienced users should exercise caution. Tinctures are a little different from oils in that they use alcohol and a solvent to extract cannabinoids and terpenes from the plant material. They are taken by placing a dose under the tongue and allowing it to dissolve. This allows the active compounds to bypass the digestive system and enter the bloodstream directly, making them much faster working than oils. Oils and tinctures are a popular choice for people who want to benefit from cannabis without getting high as it is easy to get hold of products containing only CBD, the non-intoxicating part of the plant.   TOPICAL CANNABIS CREAMS Another way to use marijuana without smoking it is with topical creams which is something this 50+ uses daily and plan to use for the rest of my days. We try every cream we carry, so you know when you but from Ideal Buds, the product is Tried and True! These are a great solution for those sticky, congealed, tacked down tissues that start to work right on application; you can feel then start to work and continue to provide relief all day long! They are ideal for people suffering from pain or skin conditions as they can be applied directly to the area where they are needed most. Many topical products we carry also contain other ingredients to complement cannabis’ soothing effects, and the act of massaging the skin can be very healing in itself. How to Use Cannabis Without Smoking It: Final Thoughts Cannabis has long been associated with smoking, but there is no doubt that things are starting to change. With people becoming more aware of the dangers of smoking, it is easy to see why there are now so many alternatives available and more being created all the time. Whether you are looking for the fast relief provided by vaping and dabbing or the longer-lasting effects of edibles or oils, there are a great variety of products from which to choose at Ideal Buds so check out our menu at www.idealbudsinc.com or come in and talk to one of our Expertly Trained Budtenders who will be happy to help you find your Ideal Products! There has never been a better time to reap the benefits of cannabis without damaging your health. …

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Strains of the Same Name are Not Necessarily the Same

People often wonder, do cannabis strain names matter? There are thousands of cannabis strains, each with their own unique chemical profile that affects everyone differently. On top of that, new cannabis strains are being created all the time. It’s impossible to keep up with the latest strains. But, with such a variety of strains, do strain names alone tell you what kind of experience you’ll have? In some cases, especially in the black market, marijuana strain names have become nothing more than a marketing gimmick to attract users who want that strain name. In reality, each cannabis plant has a different chemical composition based on its environment that can have different effects on everyone’s specific endocannabinoid system. Even strains with the same name can vary in cannabinoid and terpene content between strains.Unreliability in strain names can be rampant in the cannabis world. In some cases, unreliability between cannabis strains can be brought on by cannabis growers who intentionally change a strain’s name to a more popular one. Furthermore, growers who haven’t stabilized their strain genetics can end up with inconsistent characteristics between each plant. Master breeders spend many years crossbreeding distinct phenotypes of a large batch in order to achieve their desired characteristics. Similarities in THC Content:One study from the University of British Columbia (UBC) Okanagan examined cannabinoid profiles of 33 strains grown by five licensed producers. According to the findings, THC and CBD percentages were similar across most cannabis strains. Professor Susan Murch told Scienmag that “in a structured program we would keep track of the lineage, such as where the parent plants came from and their characteristics.” Informal breeding programs have prevented a precise chemical breakdown of strains. Researchers also found differences among strains in the minor cannabinoids that were previously undiscovered. While they are present in trace amounts, further research into the effects of these minor compounds could shape the medical cannabis field. Reliable and Unreliable Strains:Producer Lab partners tested the reliability of popular marijuana strains grown in the U.S. and Canada. Based on their findings, the most reliable strain names were White Tahoe Cookies, Purple Punch, Blue Dream, and Gelato. Granddaddy Purple, Bubba Kush, Girl Scout Cookies, and Blueberry were also relatively reliable, albeit, not as much as the aforementioned strains. Strain name reliability is determined by the level of similarity in terpene and cannabinoid content between strains with the same name. In theory, reliable strains would have a similar chemical profile from grower to grower. The most unreliable strain names were Pineapple Express and Durban Poison. That means that if you get any of those strains, you’ll likely have wildly varying experiences due to the differences in chemical profile between strains. Data was also measured for “how similar two flower products with the same strain name would be to each other if strain names were randomly assigned.” They measured the level of consistency between samples after “randomly shuffling the names attached to each data sample.” Surprisingly, the level of reliability for products with randomly assigned names was similar to the reliability of strains like Blueberry and Granddaddy Purple. Terpene Profiles:Popular strains’ terpene profiles were matched to determine the similarity between batches. Blue Dream was considered a fairly reliable strain with a common concentration of myrcene, pinene, and caryophyllene. About 80 percent of Blue Dream flower products tested had a similar terpene profile. The reliability of the strain may be due to the wide clone availability during the early 2000s that kept the genetics stable. Myrcene is one of the most commonly found terpenes among cannabis cultivars. According to the data, about 40 percent of cannabis flowers have myrcene as their dominant terpene. Myrcene was the most common terpene in 54 percent of the Blue Dream tested. 24 percent of growers had a pinene-forward Blue Dream with myrcene concentrations following close behind. Unreliable strains like Durban Poison were shown to have wildly varying chemical profiles between flower products. Durban Poison’s most common terpene was terpinolene, but the data shows that the strain had no distinct chemical profile. Its inconsistency could be due to its origins in Durban, South Africa and its rarity among growers. Furthermore, the rarity of such strains has increased counterfeit issues because of growers looking to make a quick buck. How to Find a Consistent Experience:Most cannabis strains you’ll find at a Ideal Buds will be the actual strain it purports to be. There may be some differences in the chemical profile due to cultivation methods and environmental factors. The best way to maintain as close to a consistent experience as possible is to trust the knowledge and experience provided by the owners of Ideal Buds who Try It Before You Buy It because this is our wheelhouse and our customers Cannabis experience is our primary concern. Some growers will even spring for terpene testing to show consumers the levels of terpenes that may dictate their experience and these producers are often found in our store. New lab testing methods can be used to determine a strain’s purity, potency, and consistency, but most cannabinoid tests still have a wide range of variance (often as much as 3%). Despite growers’ best efforts, varying environmental conditions will create plants with the same strain but varying levels of cannabinoids, terpenes, and chemical compounds. Customers can rely on strain names from their favorite growers, but the full range of chemical compounds is more important when determining how the strain will affect you, and that’s where our knowledge and experience of the bud serves you well. You can count on getting the best bud at Ideal Buds every time …

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Cannabis Too Strong? 11 Ways to Come Back Down

Overindulged in some edibles? Smoked a strain that was way more potent than you expected? Maybe the pot took longer to kick in and you’ve got stuff to do. No worries. There are things you can do to cut the buzz so you come down faster. We’ve rounded up some of the more popular strategies for coming down. If one doesn’t seem to work, don’t hesitate to try another. These aren’t an exact science, and reactions can vary from person to person. Relax This is easier said than done when you’ve overindulged. But a little R&R really will help tame the buzz. And trust us: You’re not dying. Really. Find a quiet place to sit or lie back and try to relax. Breathing exercises or listening to music can help you chill. If you do decide to go for some music, consider something you know all the words to, and sing along. This can help you stay grounded in the present moment. Eventually, the buzz will fade to a feeling of relaxation or even drowsiness. Go with it and let yourself fall asleep. Even a quick cat nap will do you good. Try some CBD It seems counterintuitive, but people including myself use CBD to counteract the effects of too much THC. Like THC, CBD is a type of cannabinoid found in cannabis. But unlike THC, which causes the high, CBD interacts with different receptors in your brain. Researchers don’t know exactly how yet, but several animal and human studies have shown benefits of CBD for different forms of anxiety. Bonus: CBD helps some folks fall asleep. This can come in handy if you’re greening out. Drink something No, this doesn’t mean knocking back a few brews. Stick to water and other nonalcoholic drinks. Drinking water before, during, and after any kind of drug use is always a good approach. It can be particularly helpful when it comes to Cannabis, which tends to leave you with dry mouth. It’s also an easy activity that gives you something to focus on. Try black pepper According to the internet and Neil Young, a taste or whiff or two of black pepper helps combat the paranoia and anxiety that a major high can bring on. I’ve tried this and it totally worked!! Just grab a container of black pepper and sniff, being sure not to inhale it. You can also pop two or three whole peppercorns in your mouth and chew on them. It sounds too good to be true, but there’s actually some science behind it. Caryophyllene, a compound in peppercorn, is a potent selective CB2 antagonist. It increases the sedating effects of THC, which could calm you down. Reach for a lemon Like peppercorn, lemons also contain compounds, such as limonene, that have a calming effect. Eating some lemon or squeezing some lemon juice into your water will counteract some of the psychoactive effects of THC and help you come down. To get the most bang for your buck, zest the lemon peel into your water, or steep some lemon peel in hot water. The peel contains the highest concentration of limonene. Eat pine nuts Pine nuts may counteract the effects of THC, according to some research. Pinene, a compound in pine nuts, is believed to have a calming effect and help improve clarity. Interestingly, pinene is also one of the terpenes found in cannabis that gives weed smoke a pine-like aroma. Skip this method if you have a tree nut allergy. Focus on something else Shifting your focus to something other than your high can stop you from fixating on it, which only makes it seem even worse than it is. The key to making this tip work? Keep it simple. Steer clear of potentially anxiety-inducing video games or horror films. Change your channel Not sure where to direct your attention? Here are a few ideas: Watch a show or YouTube video that’s sure to give you the warm and fuzzies and is interesting enough to keep your attention. Try mindful colouring. Read a book (if you’re one of those people who can read while stoned). Do a simple puzzle, such as a word search or a jigsaw puzzle. Find a simple organizational task, such as sorting your loose change or sorting your books by colour. Cuddle a pet Ideally, you’ll cuddle your own pet since snuggling random dogs and cats could get weird. Spending time with pets has loads of proven health benefits, including stress and anxiety relief. Spending even just a few minutes with a pet can slow your heart rate, lower your blood pressure, and increase feelings of happiness and relaxation. No pet of your own? Pull up that one dog video you love. Get some food in your belly Not eating enough before using pretty much any drug is usually bad news. Getting some food in you may help you feel a bit more normal. Some people swear by high fat or carb heavy foods, though there’s no evidence to back this up. Your best bet is to go with whatever’s nearby and easy. Take a walk Go for a short walk, even if it’s for only 10 or 15 minutes. Some light movement can help: distract you so you don’t fixate on your high lower your blood pressure relieve stress and anxiety improve your mood burn off some excess energy if you’re feeling jumpy Talk to a friend Your buddy can’t lower your blood THC levels, but hanging out with them could help calm you. The buddy system is also a good way to keep you from doing anything risky when you’re under the influence. Call a trusted (and sober) friend, and have them hang with you till you’re feeling better. The bottom line You can’t always predict how cannabis will hit you, especially if you’re new to weed or using a new strain. If you find yourself dealing with a higher high than you expected, don’t freak out — it will pass. …

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You’re buying weed wrong and so is everyone else!

There’s much more to cannabis than THC—for solid proof, look no further than the CBD boom—but when it comes to moving product on the legal recreational market, only two numbers matter: the list price, and the THC content.  Super-potent cannabis flower, with THC percentages of 25 percent and up, dominate dispensary shelves. High-THC cannabis will sell out very quickly while lower-percentage weed gathers dust.  When cannabis tests at more than 25 percent THC, dispensaries can justify charging $75 or more for a store-bought eighth—because there’s a very good chance people will pay it, confident that they’re taking home the best and most potent weed available. If the weed’s in the teens, well, it had better be cheap. The problem is that this is all wrong. All of it. THC shopping is almost as bad and dumb as buying wine based on how cool the label looks (which is also how some people buy weed).  Not only does THC content have nothing to do with how “good” the weed is, as recent research conducted by the University of Colorado and published in JAMA Psychiatry found, THC content is also a poor indicator of potency.  High-THC weed doesn’t even get you “more high”! Researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Institute of Cognitive Science documented the experiences of 121 cannabis users. Half the study participants were users of cannabis concentrates—very-high THC cannabis extracts—and the other half preferred cannabis flower.  Both groups received cannabis at varying “strengths”: flower users tried cannabis flower at either 16 percent or 24 percent THC, and extract users received oil at either 70 percent or 90 percent THC. Researchers checked study participants’ blood and monitored their mood, cognitive function, and intoxication level before, immediately after, and one hour after use. As the researchers expected, the concentrate users had very high levels of THC in their bodies after use. But they weren’t “more high.”  In fact, every participants’ self-reported “highness” was about the same—“as were their measures of balance and cognitive impairment,” as CU noted in a news release. Medium THC flower, high-THC flower—all the same high! This was not what the researchers were expecting.  “People in the high concentration group were much less compromised than we thought they would be,” said coauthor Kent Hutchinson, a professor of psychology who studies addiction, in a CU news release. “If we gave people that high a concentration of alcohol it would have been a different story.” Consider the cannabis flower users. Sixteen percent THC compared to 24 percent THC is a big difference—50 percent “stronger.” How can users of such different “strength” products report such similar psychoactive effects? The short answer is a theory that cannabis connoisseurs and cannabis scientists have been saying for years: There are many more factors at play than THC. Put slightly longer: Judging a cannabis strain on its THC content is not unlike judging a film based on the lead actor. The THC number isn’t going to be an indicator of the performance.  (One very large exception to this: edibles. If one edible says it has 100 milligrams of THC, and another says it has 10 milligrams, and you eat the 100, you will absolutely be higher, longer, than if you ate the 10.) There are a host of cannabinoids, including CBD as well as more than 100 others—most of which aren’t even tested for. (Even if they were, would the average buyer know what to do?)  There are also aromatic compounds called terpenes that dictate how cannabis affects the mind and body. All of these work in concert, a phenomenon known as “the entourage effect.” This is why synthetic THC simply didn’t have the same medical effects as smoking weed. A good way—maybe the best way—to determine if cannabis will be good, or at least good for you, is to smell it. But in legal markets like California, that’s now impossible. Pot is sold in prepackaged containers. And the coronavirus pandemic eliminated what limited opportunities there were to smell cannabis. Some shops let you wave under your nose a designated “smell jar”—a few buds in a container with a perforated lid. No longer. But back to THC numbers. Cannabis researchers know it’s not an indicator. Cannabis growers and sellers know it’s bogus. And yet, here we are. The market simply hasn’t caught on—and merchants, by putting high-THC cannabis out on the shelves to satisfy the misdirected market demand, are ensuring that the misunderstanding continues. “It’s a shame,” said Neil Dellacava, the co-founder of Gold Seal, a San Francisco-based cannabis brand that specializes in high-end flower. “I find stuff that’s absolutely amazing that I have to throw in the trash because it tests at 18 or 19 percent.”  At that level, despite “an amazing terpene profile, the best smoke I’ve ever had” simply will not sell, he said.  “People just don’t understand,” he added. “When people go shopping, they look for two things: they’re looking for price, and they’re looking for THC percentage.” The THC fallacy persists despite everyone’s best efforts. Both Instagram influencers as well as cannabis entrepreneurs and advocates have tried to explain that the THC number is, at best, a rough estimate (and a number that, depending on the lab that came up with it, might be inflated or suspect).  With this much momentum, it’s unlikely science will change anything. It will take a long time for buyers to adjust their habits and realize THC content isn’t like alcohol by volume on a beer label after all. Until they do, connoisseurs can take advantage of the market inefficiency, and take home superior pot with lower THC levels at a reduced price. It will just require a little more work on the consumer’s end.  But it will also require cultivators of lower THC, higher-high weed to have demand high enough to keep them in business, and that’s far from guaranteed. Source: …

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Cannabis and your Heart

Cannabis has been legal for medicinal use in Canada since 2001. Since 2018, many cannabis products have been legal for recreational use, including dried cannabis, fresh cannabis, cannabis oil and cannabis seeds for cultivation. In 2019, cannabis edibles, topicals and extracts (including cannabis vape products) became legal.  There is currently little high-quality scientific evidence about the impact of recreational cannabis use on heart conditions and stroke.  Emerging evidence shows an increased risk for heart disease and stroke from the effects of cannabis on blood pressure, inflammation of the blood vessels and cardiac arrhythmias1,2,3,4  Other reports link cannabis use with cardiovascular emergencies, including heart attack, arrhythmias, heart failure, stroke and cardiac arrest  Some research shows that long-term or excessive use of cannabis, increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.1,3,8  Respiratory illness and deaths in the United States have been linked to vape products, many of which are cannabis (THC) vaping products obtained through informal sources.9  Heart & Stroke recommends reviewing the Lower-Risk Cannabis User Guidelines to assess the safest modes of cannabis use. Consumers should follow guidance and advisories from Health Canada related to vape products and if vaping cannabis, always obtain THC extracts for vaping from authorized dealers.  Source; www.heartandstroke.ca  …

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Canadian Cannabis Laws: Summarized

Federal Cannabis Laws: purchase 30 grams of dried cannabis or the calculated “equivalent”. There are dried cannabis equivalent calculations for Cannabis products OTHER THAN dried cannabis flower; edibles, extracts, concentrates and topical cannabis products. Each vary so refer to packaging details.  possess up to 30 grams of dried legal cannabis or equivalent in non-dried form in public;  grow up to four cannabis plants per household (not per person) for personal use, from licensed seeds or seedlings from licensed suppliers;  share up to 30 grams of dried cannabis or equivalent with other adults;  make legal cannabis-containing products at home, such as food and drinks, provided that dangerous organic solvents are not used in making them.  Provincial Cannabis Laws: Where you can use it  The government has enacted the following rules for using cannabis, both medical and recreational.  Where you can smoke and vape cannabis  Private residences – this does not include residences that are also workplaces (for example, long-term care and retirement homes)  Many outdoor public places (subject to the smoke free Ontario Act)  Designated smoking guest rooms in hotels, motels and inns  Residential vehicles and boats that meet certain criteria (for example, if they have permanent sleeping accommodations and cooking facilities, and are parked or anchored)  Scientific research and testing facilities (if the cannabis use is for scientific research and testing purposes)  Controlled areas in: long-term care homes  certain retirement homes  residential hospices  provincially-funded supportive housing  designated psychiatric facilities or veterans’ facilities Additional restrictions on smoking and vaping may exist in municipal bylaws, lease agreements and the policies of employers and property owners.  Where you cannot smoke or vape cannabis  Indoors  You cannot smoke or vape cannabis in:  indoor common areas in condos, apartment buildings and university/college residences  enclosed public places and enclosed work places  non-designated guest rooms in hotels, motels and inns  Schools and places where children gather  You cannot smoke or vape cannabis:  at school, on school grounds, and all public areas within 20 metres of these grounds  on children’s playgrounds and public areas within 20 metres of playgrounds  in child care centres or where an early years program is provided  in places where home child care is provided — even if children aren’t present  Hospitals, hospices, care homes and other facilities  You cannot smoke or vape cannabis:  within 9 metres from the entrance or exit of hospitals (public and private), psychiatric facilities, long-term care homes, independent health facilities  on outdoor grounds of hospitals (public and private) and psychiatric facilities  in non-controlled areas in long-term care homes, certain retirement homes, provincially-funded supportive housing, designated psychiatric or veterans’ facilities, and residential hospices  Publicly owned spaces  You cannot smoke or vape cannabis in publicly-owned sport fields (not including golf courses), nearby spectator areas and public areas within 20 metres of these areas.  Vehicles and boats  You cannot consume cannabis (smoking, vaping and eating) in a vehicle or boat that is being driven or will be driven.  Other outdoor areas  You cannot smoke or vape cannabis:  in restaurants and on bar patios and public areas within 9 metres of a patio  on outdoor grounds of specified Ontario government office buildings  in reserved seating areas at outdoor sports and entertainment locations  on grounds of community recreational facilities and public areas within 20 metres of those grounds  in sheltered outdoor areas with a roof and more than two walls which the public or employees frequent, or are invited to (for example, a bus shelter)  Cannabis and Driving: Overview  Driving a vehicle while you’re impaired by cannabis is illegal and dangerous. This includes cars, trucks, boats, snowmobiles and off-road vehicles.  You are not a safer driver when you’re high. Cannabis affects your judgment, coordination and reaction time, and increases your chances of being in a collision. In 2016, 74 people were killed in collisions involving a driver under the influence of drugs in Ontario according to police reports.  Barely high is still too high to drive – don’t risk your future or your life. Never get behind the wheel after using cannabis.  Zero tolerance for young, novice or commercial drivers  Just like alcohol, you are not allowed to have any cannabis in your system (as detected by a federally approved drug screening device) if you are driving. The penalties for violating Ontario’s zero tolerance law include licence suspensions and financial penalties. Repeat offenders face longer suspensions and additional consequences such as mandatory education and treatment programs.  Medical cannabis users  You will not be subject to the zero tolerance drug requirements. You may still face penalties and criminal charges if your ability to drive has been impaired.  How to avoid impaired driving  Impairment from cannabis begins almost immediately and can last up to 6 hours or more, depending on factors such as THC levels and how it is consumed. The effects can last longer if you’re a new user, have consumed a lot or have combined cannabis with alcohol.  Since the effects of cannabis vary, there is no way to know exactly how long to wait before it’s safe to drive. Even if you think the high has worn off, your ability to drive may still be impaired.  The best way to avoid impaired driving is to not take a chance. Plan another way home:  have a designated driver  use public transit  call a friend or family member for a ride  call a taxi or ride share  stay overnight  Enforcement and penalties  If a police officer finds that you are impaired by any drug or alcohol, you will face serious penalties, including:  an immediate licence suspension  financial penalties  possible vehicle impoundment  possible criminal record  possible jail time  Transporting cannabis  Similar to the rules for alcohol, it is illegal to transport cannabis in a motorized vehicle (such as a car or boat) if it is:  open (“unfastened”) and not in its original packaging  not packed in baggage and is readily available to anyone in the vehicle  It is illegal to take cannabis across the Canadian border. For information on transporting cannabis in an airplane within Canada, check with your …

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What Are Terpenes?

Terpenes give cannabis strains their unique aromas.  HIGHLIGHTS  Terpenes are fragrant oils found in many types of plants that produce a unique taste and smell.  The tastes and smells of the terpenes in cannabis products have a very diverse range of aromas. Strains can produce a terpene profile that is earthy, woodsy, herbal, spicy, diesel or cheesy, all the way to citrusy or sweet.  Many terpenes are unique to cannabis.   Cannabis gets its scent from compounds in the plants called terpenes. Terpenes are fragrant oils found in many types of plants, especially coniferous (evergreen) varieties. The chemical compounds they secrete give fruits, vegetables, flowers and herbs their signature scents. There are over 100 identified terpenes, many of which are unique to the cannabis plant.  Although cannabis is often generally associated with a certain musky aroma, each strain of cannabis has its own scent. The individual scent of a strain will be based on the amount and type of terpenes present and which ones are dominant. Terpene scents range from earthy, woodsy, herbal, spicy, diesel or cheesy, all the way to citrusy or sweet.  Making this equation even more complex, each terpene can itself have multiple aroma profiles. Also, terpene levels can vary from crop to crop, which can lead to inconsistencies in the scents within the same strain.  Why are Terpenes Important?  We all have individual preferences for smells and tastes, so knowing the terpene profile of a cannabis product can help you choose one with a scent and flavour profile you’d most likely prefer.  Since many terpenes are associated with various types of plants and herbs used in naturopathic remedies, some theorize that terpenes play a role in the effect of cannabis. For instance, linalool, a common terpene found in lavender, may be associated with relaxation. Some also believe in the theory of “the entourage effect,” referring to the possibility that cannabinoids and terpenes work together in the overall effect of cannabis. As of now, these are just theories- the impact of terpenes beyond flavour and aroma has yet to be scientifically proven.   Top 6 Most Common Terpenes Found in Cannabis  LIMONENE – Scents: Lemon or Lime – Found in: Citrus Fruits, Juniper or you.    PINENE – Scents: Pine, Rosemary – Found in: Pines, Conifers, Rosemary, Sage  CARYOPHYLLENE – Scents: Peppery Spice, Wood – Found in: Black Pepper, Cloves, Balsam  TERPINOLENE – Scents: Smoke, Gasoline/Diesel, Wood – Found in: Apples, Cumin, Lilac, Tea Tree Oil, Conifers  MYRCENE – Scents: Musk, Earth, Ripe Fruit – Found in: Mango, Lemongrass, Hops, Thyme  LINALOOL – Scents: Sweet Flowers, Citrus – Found in: Lavender and Many Flowers, Mint, Cinnamon  Source; Ontario Cannabis …

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RESETTING YOUR RECEPTORS

Tolerance is not necessarily a bad thing  Some medical cannabis users prefer to have a baseline tolerance to some of the effects of THC, such as dizziness, so that they can dose more comfortably while still functioning in their daily life. Each medical cannabis user will have their unique sweet spot to control symptoms while balancing other daily responsibilities. Please be aware that Health Canada’s guidelines around THC use and driving still apply for safety.  Tolerance should not be confused with addiction since cannabis itself is not addictive. The use and abuse of cannabis is a function of behaviour, with interrelated psychological and environmental factors at play. When you stop using cannabis for a short time to reset your tolerance, you will not experience a dependence-related withdrawal  What can I do to reset my tolerance?  1. Micro dose  Micro dosing, or consuming a minimal amount of cannabis on a regular basis, is a popular method of use for medical purposes. In this way, you can get the benefits of THC without developing a tolerance to its effects. By micro dosing, you can be medicated all day without overwhelming your CB1 receptors with larger doses.  2. Switch to CBD-rich strains  Both psychoactive THC and non-impairing CBD engage the endocannabinoid system. However, these two compounds work in fundamentally different ways. We know that CBD works on many receptors, and not just on our CB receptors. For this reason, it is much harder to become tolerant to the effects of CBD. Opting for a high-CBD strain may be helpful to those looking to decrease their tolerance to THC, but who still require the relaxation and pain relief cannabis offers.  3. Mix things up  Rotate strains or try using new consumption methods such as vaporizing. Change up your routine. For example, skipping consumption in the morning may encourage the onset of stronger effects during evening use.  4. Try a fast partial resensitization  Used to drop the amount of cannabis needed to achieve desired medical effects, this method only requires a few days’ break. Use no cannabis at all for two full days. On the third day, take one puff and then wait for five minutes. If you feel any effect of the cannabis at all, put down your cannabis and do not use anymore that day. If you don’t, however, feel anything in the five minutes of after first puff, then take one more puff and wait another five minutes. Continue this process until even the smallest effect is felt.  Once you hit that point, stop for the day. Continue this process of one puff, waiting, and ceasing as soon as you feel any effect, for the next three days. On the fourth day, resume your regular use and timing. You should find that your body requires much less, even up to only one-half, of the cannabis that you previously needed to achieve the same medical effects.  5. Do a complete tolerance break.  This method has a double effect of both increasing the amount of added receptors and restoring your baseline receptors to normal function. It requires stopping all cannabis use for at least two days and up to four weeks. CB1 downregulation begins to reverse surprisingly rapidly upon termination or decrease of cannabis use. Studies show that tolerance can start to change within two days of abstaining from using cannabis.  Enjoy your tolerance break by staying active as much as possible, and make sure to hydrate often. Engaging in rewarding physical activities will help make resetting your endocannabinoid system more effective. Eating well and focusing on proper nutrition will also give more positive results. Try going for a run, cooking a healthy meal, or taking on a hobby that will offer some positive reward or self-satisfaction.  Cannabis has an interesting and noble effect — it provides comfort, care, and treatment for genuine needs, at the level the user needs. As such, many see it as a spiritual plant and have great respect for its varied effects and how it communicates within our bodies to help bring things back to balance. Take this time to focus on the benefits of cannabis and make an effort to be mindful and thankful for what this plant has to …

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Addiction to Cannabis

Contrary to popular belief, people can become addicted to cannabis. Continued, frequent and heavy cannabis use can cause physical dependency and addiction. Some people can develop tolerance to the effects of cannabis. Tolerance is characterized by a need for larger doses of a drug to maintain the same effects. Tolerance can develop after a few doses. In some people, tolerance can eventually lead to physical dependence and/or addiction. Addiction can develop at any age, but youth are especially vulnerable because their brains are still developing. Some people are also more prone to becoming addicted than others. It’s estimated that 1 in 3 who use cannabis will develop a problem with their use. It’s also estimated that 1 in 11 (9%) of those who use cannabis will develop an addiction to it. This statistic rises to about 1 in 6 (17%) for people who started using cannabis as a teenager. If a person smokes cannabis daily, the risk of addiction is 25% to 50%. Problematic cannabis use can include some or all of these behaviors: failing to fulfill major duties at work home school giving up important social, occupational or recreational activities because of cannabis use consuming it often and in larger amounts or over a longer period than intended being unable to cut down on or control cannabis use If you show most or all of these behaviors over a 12-month period you may have cannabis addiction. Comparison with other substances All substances that affect the mind carry their own set of risks and harms, some unique to the substance. The most well-established, long term harm of regular cannabis use is addiction. It is often difficult to compare risks and harms between substances. Nevertheless, based on what is currently known, the risk of cannabis addiction is lower than the risk of addiction to alcohol, tobacco or opioids. And, unlike substances such as alcohol or opioids where overdoses may be fatal, a cannabis overdose is not fatal. (Source …

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Cannabis and Mold

Thinking about growing your own? Cannabis, by nature is a mold haven and we know that mold affects health. Mold exposure can cause sickness, allergy symptoms, blurred vision, nausea, etc etc. But did you know, that by being exposed to mold, your emotional and cognitive sides are also affected? According to James Schaller, M.D., CMR and Gary Rosen, PhD, CIE, in the book Mold Illness and Mold Remediation Made Simple, Mold chemicals can affect cognition, emotions, and personality! They’ve made a list of all the different affects mold can have: Mold Affects Emotions, Cognition, & Personality mood swings mania irritability impulsivity increased risk taking decreased speech smoothness poor stress coping increased verbal fighting lateness poor empathy poor boundary awareness immaturity spacey rigidity poor insight decreased productivity unable to process trauma or pain increased narcissism forgetfulness poorly or obsessively organized dead creativity depression panic attacks decreased attention eccentric personality increased drug or alcohol consumption Of course mold is not the only cause of these mental issues, but it can be a direct source as well as worsen the prognosis …

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DON’T DRIVE HIGH

Cannabis affects your ability to subconsciously react correctly to more than one event or if many things are going on, for example a ball bouncing out in front of you while driving, would be noticed right away but cannabis will delay the “hey what about a kid chasing it” part of the reaction. It impairs the realization of a series of events (source CBC)  Rear-end collisions become a factor with people” who are under the influence of cannabis.  (source CBC)  You’re simply more distracted than you realize  As far as your insurance companies concerned its impaired driving, depending on you insurer, your policy might not cover ANY loss damages! Your premiums could triple as well. (source Globe and Mail)  Wait a MINIMUM of 4 hours after ingesting “any” amount of cannabis (like 1 puff). If you got “wasted” (very high) wait a full 8 hours (Source …

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Cannabis Effects on Youth

Research shows the brain is not fully developed until around age 25. Thus, youth are especially vulnerable to the effects of cannabis on brain development and function. The THC in cannabis affects the same biological system in the brain that directs brain development.  Cannabis use has been associated with increased risk of harms when it:  is frequent  continues over time  begins early in adolescence  Some of the harms may not be fully reversible.  It is therefore important for parents, teachers, coaches and other trusted adults to be ready to talk with youth about drugs.  So if you’re under 25 and haven’t tried cannabis yet DON’T! If you are under 25 and a regular user, it may be time reconsider reducing the impact to your brain and health by cutting down, cutting back, change to vaping or quitting all …

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How Does Vaporizing Cannabis Differ from Smoking It?

You now know that vaporizing marijuana involves heating it up without combustion. This means you enjoy the plant without setting it on fire. In contrast, when you light up a joint, it burns the weed because the maximum temperature can reach an astonishing 1,093 degrees Celsius! Remember, cannabinoids begin to vaporize at just 190 degrees (THC); far below the temperature reached when smoking weed.  The biggest difference between vaporization and combustion is how clean the vaping feels. When you vape, you inhale the cannabinoids and terpenes and get a better sense of a cannabis strain’s aroma and taste. A 2007 study authored by Donald I. Abrams of UCSF and published in the journal Neurology, for example, found that vaporizing weed just below the combustion temperature caused very little exposure to the toxic chemicals created by combustion. Moreover, there was no reduction in the high.  While smoking weed is still a wonderful experience, it produces over 100 chemicals not released by vaporization and several of them are potentially carcinogenic. When you light a joint, you can expect it to heat the cannabis to a temperature of over 1,000 degrees; not all of the compounds released during combustion are good, and it produces as much tar as a tobacco cigarette. As you can imagine, this is bad news for the respiratory system and lungs.  Vaping uses less cannabis for the same high! When you chose to vape you’re choosing a healthier and less expensive form of cannabis …

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Drug Interactions

CANNABIS IS A DRUG THAT REACTS WITH OTHER DRUGS YOU MAY BE ON!  This is only an example of drugs affected by cannabis; this list IS NOT complete there are many more, so if you’re on ANY PRESCRIPTION drugs know that cannabis WILL affect its performance CHECK WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER (not Google)  According to the Mayo Clinic, cannabis may adversely interact with:  anabolic steroids  barbiturates benzodiazepines central nervous system depressants corticosteroids dopamine antagonists nicotine nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories opioid receptor antagonists pain relievers phytoestrogens  From WWW.DRUGS.COM Bottom of Form  Common medications checked in combination with cannabis:  Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine) Alcohol (contained in alcoholic beverages) (ethanol) amitriptyline Ativan (lorazepam) Benadryl (diphenhydramine) Cymbalta (duloxetine) Fish Oil (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) ibuprofen Klonopin (clonazepam) Lamictal (lamotrigine) Lexapro (escitalopram) Lyrica (pregabalin) morphine Norco (acetaminophen / hydrocodone) Paracetamol (acetaminophen) tramadol Tylenol (acetaminophen) Valium (diazepam) Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) Xanax (alprazolam) Zoloft (sertraline) Zyrtec …

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